Saturday, February 11, 2012

Money Market Funds Explained.


Money market funds are mutual funds. Investors who buy shares are pro-rata owners of the underlying investments that funds hold. 


Money market mutual funds are restricted by SEC rules under the Investment Company Act of 1940 to purchasing only the highest-rated debt of issuing companies. They also invest in government securities and repurchase agreements.

The duration of the debt instruments they hold cannot exceed 13 months and the average weighted maturity of their portfolios has to be 60 days or less. Additionally, funds can't hold more than 5% of one issuer, except for governments or repurchase agreements.

The first U.S. money market mutual fund, The Reserve Fund, was established in 1971 to directly compete with banks for investor deposits. At that time "Regulation Q" prohibited commercial banks from paying interest on checking accounts. 

Money market funds quickly drew in investors looking to earn interest on cash positions.

By September 2008, the size of the oldest money fund in the U.S., the Reserve Primary Fund, was $64.8 billion. Total industry assets were $3.8 trillion.



Courtesy: http://moneymorning.com/2012/02/09/money-market-funds-are-in-the-fight-of-their-lives/

No comments: