Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Big Picture: Timing The Stock Market!!

Timing requires a big-picture, top-down perspective. Here's how I look at the big picture: Identify the largest constituent elements that move the stock, sector, industry or economy you are measuring. For housing, I look at the availability of credit, the cost of credit, the trajectory of growth, and the sustainability of those trends.

In 2007, I used Countrywide Financial Corp. and IndyMac Bancorp. Inc. (OTC: IDMCQ) as proxies for credit availability, and I used interest rates on adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) and the profitability of big banks as a proxy for the cost of credit. I followed the trajectory of growth around the country simply by reading the real estate sections of newspapers. By the fall of 2007, it was easy to see strains on the proxies I was watching, even though closer to home everything looked rosy.

Both Countrywide and IndyMac faltered. That told me there was a problem with the sustainability of credit extension, especially in the subprime-mortgage market where both had made a giant push. You didn't need to read their balance sheets or income statements, the newspapers were full of telltale stories. There was plenty of evidence that teaser rates were giving way to higher rates and strains were developing on borrowers.

At the same time, big banks were having a harder time syndicating and selling off covenant-lite debt pools of leveraged loans. And there was plenty of noise about banks' shaky structured investment vehicles (SIVs), created to finance and hold risky mortgage-based assets off of their balance sheets. It became obvious that none of the trends that propelled housing were sustainable. You could just have easily seen it, too.

The tipping point for me was a couple of big quarterly losses at Fannie Mae (NYSE: FNM) and Freddie Mac (NYSE: FRE). The ultimate proxy for the entire housing market was flashing red; it was time.

No, I didn't catch the top. But, I told the readers of my blog to get out of the markets entirely and into cash in February 2008. Not cash proxies like money market funds. I mean cash.

If you were employing a timing strategy, even if you missed the exact turn - as I did - you would have locked in built-up profits, as opposed to losses.


Courtesy: http://moneymorning.com/2009/12/08/successful-market-timing/

No comments: